Chad Photo Gallery

On the road with MAG's photographer in Chad, where decades of conflict have left a lethal legacy of mines and unexploded bombs.

Nomadic camel herders who travel through Chad to Libya have changed their traditional route to avoid potential accidents with anti-vehicle mines

Since 2012 camel herders have been avoiding the traditional route through the north of the country to Libya because of repeated accidents with anti-vehicle landmines. The new route adds hundreds of miles to the journey to Libya and also causes other difficulties, due to less water points and fewer areas on the route where the animals can graze.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


A truck loaded with goods and passengers travels from Zouarke up to the Libyan border along an 'unofficial' route in order to avoid checkpoints where they will have to pay tax.

A truck loaded with goods and passengers travels from Zouarke up to the Libyan border along an unofficial route, in order to avoid checkpoints where they will have to pay tax. These routes cross huge minefields and are extremely risky.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


Remains of a vehicle that hit a mine in Chad

The remains of a vehicle that hit a mine in November 2015. Miraculously, the driver survived.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


Landmine survivor in Chad

Ali Wendith's vehicle hit a landmine in 2012. There were six people inside and Ali was the only survivor. "I was lucky, I just lost a foot - but people are dying all the time. You must clear these mines or many more people will die."

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


Canton Chief of Zouar shares his view of the landmine issue in Chad

Mahemat Togoi is Canton Chief of Zouar: "There is a huge problem with landmines in Tibesti and it causes so many problems and there have been so many accidents. They are a huge danger, a huge problem."

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


A deminer walks past the remains of a camel killed by an anti-vehicle mine in Chad.

A MAG deminer walks past the remains of a camel killed by an anti-vehicle mine. There are three other carcasses nearby.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


A MAG deminer at work. This team is clearing a vital road near Zouar, Chad.

A MAG deminer at work. This team is clearing a vital road near Zouar. The road goes to Sherda and then on to Faya, which is a principle route in the region. An anti-vehicle mine was found a few metres from here the day after this picture was taken.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


12 PRB M3 mines are destroyed in a controlled demolition in Chad.

Twelve PRB M3 anti-vehicle mines are destroyed in a controlled demolition.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


A MAG vehicle drives along a marked road close to Bardai, Chad.

A MAG vehicle drives along a marked road close to Bardai. MAG teams searched the areas on the roadsides here to reduce the chance of an accident. The dangerous areas were marked using red and white painted boulders.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


A MAG team leader attaches a pulling rope to a PRB M3 anti-vehicle mine that has just been found. The mine is then dragged from a safe distance in case the mine is booby trapped with an anti-handling device. The MAG Team Leader watches over his staff making sure they operate safely and efficiently.

The MAG Team Leader watches over as one of his staff attaches a pulling rope to a PRB M3 anti-vehicle mine that has just been found. The mine is then dragged from a safe distance in case the mine is booby trapped with an anti-handling device.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


The MAG Team transports deactivated landmines for demolition in Chad.

The MAG team transports deactivated landmines for safe demolition.

Photo: Sean Sutton/MAG


 

RELATED PAGES

 MAG in Chad: Statistics, Why we're there & What we're doing

 Landmine & UXO Clearance

 MAG's Annual Summary 2015

 

Page published: 23 April 2016

Canton Chief of Zouar shares his view of the landmine issue in Chad